News Literacy Working Group — Initial Thoughts

Can we make it un-cool to spread other people’s lies on social media? Should Facebook, Google, SnapChat, and Twitter embed tools of truth in their users’ feeds? Should journalists be vastly more transparent about how they operate? Should every public school be required to help kids learn how to be critical thinkers, and use media with integrity?

I’d answer Yes to all of those questions. And I suspect the same would be true for many if not most of the people who came to a remarkable meeting last weekend in Phoenix.

The occasion was a “News Literacy Working Group” at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. The meeting, co-convened by Facebook and ASU, brought together about 50 people from education, technology, philanthropy, and journalism. Our goal, as the group’s name suggests, was to look hard at media/news literacy’s role in the digital age — and come up with serious ideas on how to deal with an emergency situation.

What’s the emergency? It stems from the realities of democratized media and communications. As media consumers and creators, we’re blessed with a staggering array of information sources. We can know more about things we care about than ever before. But some of what we see, and what too many of us share, is bogus — often deliberately so by people whose motives are profits or ideology, or both. And we’ve seen in recent months the poisonous effect the deceitful minority are having on public discourse and knowledge.

How can we respond? One way, in the fabled marketplace of ideas, is to upgrade our supply of journalism — a never-ending need.

But this is, in my mind, at least as much a demand problem: upgrading ourselves as active users of media, not just passive consumers. While supply and demand were both on our weekend agenda — and are intertwined in an age of social media — we were there to focus primarily on the latter.

I’m somewhat constrained by “Chatham House Rules” in what I can say here. These rules, which are widely used at meetings, basically prohibit me from saying who was there (without specific permission) or attributing what they said (also unless I have specific permission). But I can give you a flavor of what happened, and some details.

For me, the linchpin was to get people from the different sectors (e.g. education, tech, journalism, etc.) into the same room. This extended to some of the breakout groups, and it gave people an opportunity to look beyond their own specialties for cross-disciplinary approaches.

All kinds of ideas and recommendations emerged. We sorted them out in several overlapping categories, including a) educational needs; b) journalists’ role; c) technology’s role; d) what research needs to be done; and e) how to put this more firmly in the policy agenda and public consciousness.

I won’t go into detail on each of those, though I plan to expand on key thoughts in subsequent posts. Rather, after comparing notes with my colleague Eric Newton, here’s a short list of ideas that struck me as most immediately intriguing (again, among many others, and not in any particular order):

  • Get state legislatures to require media/news literacy in school curricula. (One suggestion was for the tech platforms to use a small part of their already-massive lobbying budgets to push for this.)
  • Come up with tools that help media users instantly get a much better idea of the context of what they’re looking at: metadata and more to be clearer on whether this or that piece of content deserves trust. A lot is already going on in this arena, but I heard several fascinating new approaches that I’ll talk more about later on.
  • Get the platforms to embed information about how things work. An example was auto-complete, which is a mystery to most people. The platform companies shouldn’t do this entirely on their own, several people said (and I agree); it should be a collaboration to give it more credibility.
  • Find ways to help media organizations embed media/news literacy into their own work. I’m still baffled, and beyond disappointed, that the journalism industry has abjectly failed to do this despite the obvious evidence that being leaders in media/news literacy would have engendered more trust from their audiences. One approach to begin to repair the damage, which I strongly favor, is to be much more transparent about what, how, and why they do their work.
  • Take a page from the anti-smoking campaign that has led to major improvement in public health, at least related to tobacco-caused illnesses, and create a campaign to make it un-cool to spread BS. We have tons of data from that campaign on what works, and what doesn’t. If we can enlist Hollywood, hip-hop stars, and other notables in this, we can do it.
  • Do much more research. We need to know better how deceit starts and spreads in all kinds of media, especially online; how what works and what doesn’t work in news literacy; how people actually use media (as opposed to how they say they do); and much more. A recurring theme, especially among researchers and journalists, was leaning on the platforms — especially Facebook — to open up their all-important data sets to researchers. (This will be a major challenge, to put it mildly, because for the big tech companies the data sets are pretty much the keys to the kingdoms. Without their help, however, research will be at best incomplete.)
  • Embed news literacy tools and training directly into the platforms. As I’ve said before, this is the one I think could have the greatest impact since we need scale. But it’s also a significant product change, more than a tweak, and I doubt it’ll happen soon in any major way.
  • Launch a “moonshot” that aims to give everyone kids and adults — the tools and skills they need to navigate our increasingly complex information ecosystem. This would be great, but only if there are serious resources involved.
  • We don’t only need to come up with new ideas. We should help the people who’ve been in the trenches in the media/news literacy fields to do more of it, and learn from their experiences.
  • Look outside the U.S., because this is a global problem. (The tech companies may know this better than anyone.)
  • In general, collaborate like crazy. I think we did some last weekend, and we can do way, way more.

Mea culpa regarding important one element of the gathering: We didn’t have remotely enough cultural and political diversity among the attendees. If and when we do something like this again (I trust we will), fixing that will be at the top of my to-do list.

As to outcomes, that’s TBD. We had people in the room whose organizations can write big checks, or do things with their products that could make a difference in a hurry, or both. (One of the philanthropies that sent a representative — Josh Stearns, a friend and great ally in all this — was the Democracy Fund. Craig Newmark, another friend who has started putting serious money into supporting quality information, was also there.)

None of this would have happened without the support of Facebook’s Áine Kerr and her colleagues. Their professionalism, hard work, and commitment to the ideas made this collaboration a pleasure. As I said in a pre-gathering post, I continue to have strong differences with the company on some issues. But on this — the need to help users of media be vastly more savvy about what they’re consuming and creating, and to understand the importance of doing things ethically — we are allies.

“Grateful” is too small a word to describe my thanks to the invited participants. They were the working group. They worked effectively and collaboratively. They taught me all kinds of things I didn’t know, which for me is the best kind of meeting. And they made me even more eager to move forward.

My overwhelming takeaway from the meeting: Our society (and others) could be the verge of getting much more serious about media/news literacy as an essential element of creating a sustainable and honorable information ecosystem. That’s good news indeed.

I don’t know anyone who assumes that our society’s bogus-information problem will be easily or quickly solved. But I do think everyone who came to the Cronkite School for this meeting agreed that we’re in something of an emergency situation — and that the time to move on it is right now.

(Cross-posted at Medium.)

5 thoughts on “News Literacy Working Group; Initial Thoughts

  1. This is sooooo excellent. Thank you for starting this, I hope it snowballs and becomes monstrous. 🙂

    Some people should take on the ideas of spreading your media literacy course and figuring out ways for non-journalistic people can get involved and contribute.

  2. ニュースの信頼を取り戻す、とメディアの論客がいう
    コメントする
    04/08/2017 by kaztaira

    フェイクニュースの氾濫の背景として指摘されてきたのが、史上最低に落ち込んでいるマスメディアへの信頼だ。
    10527080696_9e44ca3144_zBy Paul Sableman (CC BY 2.0)
    フェイクニュースをめぐる取り組みとして、そのメディアへの信頼を取り戻す、「ニュース・インテグリティ・イニシアチブ」というプロジェクトが動き出した。
    主導するのは、ニューヨーク市立大学ジャーナリズムスクール教授でネットの論客でもあるジェフ・ジャービスさんだ。
    さらに、この取り組みに先行して、アリゾナ州立大学ジャーナリズムスクール教授でジャーナリストのダン・ギルモアさんは、ユーザーがフェイクニュースにだまされないための「ニュース・リテラシー」の普及を掲げたプロジェクトを始動している。
    ジャービスさんの取り組みとは、兄弟プロジェクトのような関係だ。
    そしてこの2つを支援しているは、フェイクニュース拡散の舞台として批判を受けてきたフェイスブック。ジャーナリズムとの連携を強めることで、様々なレイヤーからフェイクニュース対策に乗りだそうとしている。
    ●1400万ドルの資金
    ニューヨーク市立大学ジャーナリズムスクールは3日、新たなプロジェクト「ニュース・インテグリティ・イニシアチブ」の発足を発表した。
    プロジェクトの狙いについて、こう述べている。
    このイニシアチブの狙いは、ニュース・リテラシーの促進、世界中のジャーナリズムへの信頼の向上、社会的な議論により良質な情報を提供していくことだ。イニシアチブでは、申請をもとに研究やプロジェクトへの資金提供を行い、各分野の専門家たちによるミーティングを開催していく。
    昨年9月のギャラップの調査では、マスメディアへの信頼度は32%と史上最低に落ち込んでいる。
    ウォーターゲート事件の調査報道によって、ニクソン大統領が辞任した2年後の1976年には、マスメディアへの信頼度は72%を記録していた。40年後には、それが半減以下となった。
    PR会社、エデルマンが毎年発表している調査結果「トラスト・バロメーター」でも、メディアへの信頼度は2016年の48%から2017年には43%へと、5ポイント減少している。
    このマスメディアへの不信の広がりが、少なからぬ人たちがフェイクニュースを信じてしまう背景にある。イニシアチブでは、この問題に焦点をあてて取り組んでいくのだという。
    イニシアチブの資金の総額は1400万ドル(15億円)。
    資金を提供するのはフェイスブック、クレイグ・ニューマーク慈善基金、フォード財団、ナイト財団、トウ財団、モジラ、デモクラシー基金、ベータワークス、アップネクサスの9団体だ。
    クレイグ・ニューマークさんは、クラシファイド広告(三行広告)で知られるコミュニティサイト「クレイグズリスト」の創設者だ。
    世界70カ国、700サイト以上を運営。新聞のクラシファイド広告の収益を奪った、とも批判されるクレイグズリスト。だが、ニューマークさん本人は、ジャーナリズム支援に力を入れており、最近でも、昨年12月にジャーナリスト研修などを行うポインター研究所に100万ドル、今年3月には調査報道NPOのプロパブリカに100万ドルなどの資金提供を続けている。
    ※参照:人気サイト「クレイグズリスト」創設者、クレイグ・ニューマーク氏に聞く
    リリースの中で、ニューマークさんは、こうコメントを寄せている。
    高校の米国史の授業で、信頼できる報道は民主主義の免疫システムだと教わった。ニュースの消費者として、大多数の人々と同じく、ニュースは信頼できるものであってほしい。それはすなわち信頼できるニュースメディアのために立ち上がり、クリックベイト(クリック誘導の釣り)で疑わしいニュースを見分ける方法を学ぶ、ということだ。
    資金提供元の一つ、デモクラシー基金はネットオークションのイーベイ創業者で会長のピエール・オミディアさんの財団だ。
    オミディアさんもジャーナリズムへの関心は高い。
    オミディアさんの別の慈善団体、オミディア・ネットワークは5日、フェイクニュースやヘイトスピーチ対策として1億ドル(110億円)の資金提供を発表している。その第1弾として「パナマ文書」の調査報道を手がけた国際調査報道ジャーナリスト連合(ICIJ)に3年間で450万ドルの資金提供をすることなどを明らかにしている。

    The fight against misinformation, authoritarian lies, and online abuse is a fight we can win. https://t.co/RxBWy64pLn
    — Pierre Omidyar (@pierre) April 4, 2017

    オミディアさんは、2013年8月にアマゾン創業者のジェフ・ベゾスさんが2億5000万ドルで買収したワシントン・ポストについて、やはり同じ金額で買収を検討していたという。
    結局、ポストの買収はかなわず、その2億5000万ドルをつぎこんで、「スノーデン事件」のスクープで知られるグレン・グリーンウォルドさんらと新たなニュースベンチャー「ファースト・ルック・メディア」を設立している。
    ※参照:ジャーナリズムを支える金に色はついているか?
    ちなみにイーベイとクレイグズリストには、10年以上前から、買収をめぐる攻防の歴史もある。
    第1次ソーシャルメディアブームの2004年、イーベイは、急成長するクレイグズリストの元関係者から25%の株を買い取り、取締役を送り込んだ。イーベイの狙いはクレイグズリストの全株取得だった。
    ところが、クレイグズリストはこの介入を嫌い、新株発行増資による株式の希釈化で対抗。イーベイはこれに対して2008年、クレイグズリストを提訴。結局、2015年に、イーベイの所有株をクレイグズリストが買い戻すことで決着している。
    今回の「ニュース・インテグリティ」の資金提供には、このほかにもナイト財団、トウ財団など、ジャーナリズム支援ではよく知られた財団も参加。さらにはアドテクノロジーのアップネクサスなど、幅広い分野からの資金が集まっている。その中でも、存在感を示すのがフェイスブックだ。
    ●フェイスブックの存在感
    フェイクニュース拡散の主な舞台として、昨年の米大統領選で批判の的となったフェイスブック。
    ※参照:トランプ大統領を生み出したのはフェイスブックか? それともメディアか?
    フェイクニュース対策を迫られ、打ち出した取り組みの一つが、今年1月に発表したジャーナリズムとの連携強化「フェイスブック・ジャーナリズム・プロジェクト」だ。
    記事フォーマットからジャーナリズムのビジネスモデル、研修やツールの提供、ユーザーのリテラシー啓発まで、多様なメニューを掲げており、今回の「ニュース・インテグリティ・イニシアチブ」も同プロジェクトの一環として位置づけられている。
    そして、その兄弟プロジェクトとして先行するのが、アリゾナ州立大学ジャーナリズムスクール教授のダン・ギルモアさんが主導する「ニュース・リテラシー・ワーキンググループ」だ。
    ●「ニュース・リテラシー」をスケールする
    「ニュース・リテラシー・ワーキンググループ」は、デジタルメディア・リテラシー教育に取り組むギルモアさんの問題意識からスタートしている。
    それは、メディアリテラシーを、教育現場などでの取り組みに加えて、指数関数的に「スケール(拡張)」させる、ということだ。
    それには、グローバルなユーザー規模を持つフェイスブックなどのソーシャルメディアも、その役割を果たすべきだ、と。
    ※参照:偽ニュースの見分け方…ポスト・トゥルース時代は、まだ来ていない
    そこで、フェイスブック批判の急先鋒として知られるギルモアさんとフェイスブックが連携。3月に、ジャーナリズム、テクノロジー、教育などの各分野50人の専門家をアリゾナ州立大学に招き、第1回の会合を行った。
    ニューマークさんとジャービスさんは、この会合のメンバーでもあった。
    ワーキンググループの議論の中では、「学校のカリキュラムでのニュース・リテラシーの義務化」「報道の中にニュース・リテラシー要素を盛り込む」「禁煙普及の手法をリテラシー普及に取り入れる」など様々なアイディアが出てきた、という。
    ●ニューマークさんの問いかけ
    ジャービスさんが「ニュース・インテグリティ・イニシアチブ」を立ち上げるきっかけになったのは、フェイクニュース問題に取り組むべきではないか、とのニューマークさんからの問いかけだった、という。
    先行するギルモアさんのプロジェクトなどとは違った角度でのアプローチを検討したのが、「ニュース・インテグリティ」だった。
    まずニューマークさんから4年間の資金提供を取り付けると、フェイスブックや、メディアベンチャー支援のベータワークス、モジラなどの資金提供が次々に決まった、という。
    「ニュース・インテグリティ」のリリースの中で、ギルモアさんは、こんなコメントを寄せている。
    資金提供団体を設立するという話は、まさに1カ月前に開かれたフェイクブックとアリゾナ州立大の「ニュース・リテラシー・ワーキンググループ」の場で、主要課題として取り上げられたテーマだった。本日の発表は、ニュース・リテラシーが重要である、という強いメッセージになっている。我々はニュースのサプライサイド(供給側)だけをアップグレードすることはできない。我々は、自分自身をアップグレードし、よりよい、よりアクティブなメディアのユーザーとなり、消費者となり、そしてクリエーターになる必要がある。
    「ニュース・インテグリティ」への参加は当初、ニューヨーク市立大、アリゾナ州立大など19団体と個人。ウィキペディア創設者のジミー・ウェールズさんが個人で参加するほか、UNESCO(国際連合教育科学文化機関)や欧州のジャーナリズムスクールに加え、エデルマン、ウエーバー・シャンドウィックなどのPR会社も含まれる。地域も欧米に加えて、コロンビア、オーストラリア、香港と幅広い。
    ●「ジャーナリズムを、人々にいる場所へ」
    ジャービスさんは、「ポインター」のインタビューに答えて、「ニュース・インテグリティ」の考え方について説明している。
    その中で、フェイスブックのようなプラットフォームとジャーナリズムとの関係について、こう述べる。
    我々ジャーナリズムの人間は、プラットフォームに対して、ジャーナリズムと社会的責任、ということについて教えることができると思う。また彼らも、我々と一緒になって、サービスを提供する人々との関係をどうつくり直せばいいか、社会的な会話に良質な情報を届けるにはどうしたらいいか、を教えてくれることができる。会話は、もはや我々のサイト上だけで起きているのではないのだから。それはネット上のいたるところで起きているのだ。
    そして、今回の狙いをジャーナリズムとユーザーとの関係を近づけることにある、と。
    我々には新たなチャンスがある。ジャーナリズムを人々のいる場所へと連れていく。私はこの取り組みの中でそれを実現させたい。すなわち、ジャーナリズムを、フェイクブックやインスタグラム、ユーチューブ、その他どこでもあろうと、人々が会話をしている所に連れていく必要がある、ということだ。
    ジャービスさんは、ジャーナリズムに必要なのは、ソーシャルに流通するトークン(コイン)としてのニュースだ、という。
    我々がつくっていくべきなのは、会話の中で使われるソーシャルなトークンだ。私の娘が何かをシェアするとき、「これは優れたプロダクトだから、ぜひ見て!」とやっているわけじゃない。

    彼女がシェアするときには、こういっている。「これが私に話しかけてきた」あるいは「これが私たちの会話に入ってきた」。我々は、ニュースをそのようにリフォームし始めるべきだ。ニュース・リテラシーを検討する上で必要なのは、ニュースという名のプロダクトを人々がどう使うか、だけではない。これまでニュースと呼んできたサービスをつくり変え、いかに人々の会話にもっと入り込むようにするか、それによって、いかに人々の会話をより情報リテラシー豊かなものにするか、ということだ。
    ジャーナリズムの信頼性向上の手がかりとして、メディアとそのブランドの関係についても、指摘している。
    メディアのブランドを、もっとはっきりと表示する必要があると思う。フェイスブック上で、ガーディアンを見てみると、すべての記事に、写真とガーディアンのロゴのついた青いバーが表示されている。それによって、より明確にブランディングを把握し、情報ソースがどこかということがわかる仕組みになっている。プラットフォームは、情報ソースが良質かそうでないかの両面を明らかにするという点で、もっとできることがあると思う。
    メディアへの信頼向上に、単線の解決策はない。それは、メディアがこれまで先延ばしにしてきた、変化への対応に本腰をいれるかどうか、にかかっている。
    フェイクニュース問題をつきつめると、結局は、メディア自身が抱えてきた問題に、一つひとつ取り組んでいく必要が、改めてクローズアップされることになる。
    ———————————–

    ■デジタルメディア・リテラシーをまとめたダン・ギルモア著の『あなたがメディア ソーシャル新時代の情報術』(拙訳)全文公開中
    ※このブログは「ハフィントン・ポスト」にも転載されています。
    Twitter:@kaztaira
    『朝日新聞記者のネット情報活用術』
    電子書籍版がキンドルやiブックストア、楽天koboなどで配信中
    cover3
    Share this: Twitter Facebook いいね: いいね 読み込み中…

    関連

    カテゴリー: ad, fake news, journalism, literacy, Media, Social

Leave a Reply to Dan Gillmor Cancel reply